Centre for Road Safety

Bus Safety in NSW - 6 minutes, 5 seconds

Title: Bus safety in NSW

[Animation shows traffic moving on a large city street.]

Narrator: NSW maintains the largest metropolitan bus fleet in Australia. Passengers take more than 200 million trips on buses in NSW each year. Being safe on and around buses is important for bus passengers and all road users. Buses are large, heavy vehicles and can’t stop quickly.

[Passengers are shown inside a bus.]

Narrator: Due to their size, if a bus crashes they are more likely to cause serious injury or death. Everyone who uses NSW roads to drive, ride or walk has a responsibility to follow the road rules and share the road with others.

Graphic: Be Bus Aware, Be safe on and around buses, Bus Safety Week logo, bebusaware.com.au, NSW Government, Transport for NSW logo.

Narrator: Your actions can make a big difference and improve safety for all of us.

Title: Driving around buses

[Animation shows a bus on a busy four-lane urban street. Double unbroken white lines mark the centre of the road. The bus travels in the left lane, while two cars travel beside the bus in the right lane. The second car cuts tightly in front of the bus and stops at a traffic light, waiting to turn left. A graphic shows a large red cross of disapproval.]

Narrator: When driving near buses, don’t pull in to their lane in front of them too closely as this can reduce their stopping distance and prevent them from stopping in time to avoid a collision.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the second car brakes and merges safely into the left lane behind the bus. A large green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: Keep a safe distance behind the bus or move safely into another lane. Remember your actions can affect a busload of people.

Narrator: If a bus is pulling out of a bus stop, don’t speed up and try to overtake the bus.

[Animation shows a bus pulling out from a bus stop on a busy four-lane urban street. Double unbroken white lines mark the centre of the road. A car travelling behind the bus speeds up and passes the bus. The bus brakes to allow the car to pass. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: The size of the bus means it may be difficult for you to see passengers who have left the bus and are preparing to cross the road.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the car brakes and allows the bus to safely merge into the lane in front of the car. A large green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: The law says that when a bus is leaving a bus stop, has its indicator on and displays a ‘GIVE WAY’ sign, motorists must give way to the bus.

[Animation shows a bus braking and pulling into a bus stop. Yellow lights flash on the back of the bus. A car travelling in the same direction speeds past the bus. A large red tick of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: Some buses have a warning system that includes a 40 kilometre per hour sign and flashing lights to warn road users they are picking up or setting down school children. By law you must not drive at more than 40 kilometres per hour past a bus travelling in the same direction if its lights are flashing.

[The animation is repeated, but the car brakes and slows down before it goes past the bus. A large green tick of approval is shown.]
Narrator: Instead, slow down to 40 kilometres per hour and look out for children.

[Animation shows a bus indicating and pulling into a bus stop. The headlights on the front of the bus flash. An oncoming approaches the bus and brakes, before travelling slowly past the bus.]

Narrator: When buses are dropping off or picking up school children their headlights will also flash. Be careful when approaching a bus with flashing headlights as there may be children crossing or about to cross the road.

[Animation shows a side-on view of two cars travelling much to close behind a bus. a large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: If you drive too closely behind another vehicle, you may not be able to stop in time to avoid a crash.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the closest car to the bus is a long way behind. A white arrow appears next to the car, while a stopwatch with the words “3 seconds” inside a speech bubble indicates a safe following distance behind the bus. A large green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: As a general rule, when following a vehicle all motorists should travel 3 seconds behind the vehicle in front to allow enough time to avoid a crash.

[Animation shows the car travelling while three seconds count on the stopwatch until the car reaches a tree on the side of the road that the bus passed three seconds ago.]

Narrator: An easy way to estimate this is to count how long it takes to pass the same object as the vehicle in front of you. This should take 3 seconds.

Graphic: Walking around buses

[Animation shows commuters near a bus stop at a busy city intersection.]

Narrator: If you are planning to catch a bus don’t rush to cross the road at the last minute and place yourself at risk.

[A commuter crosses at a red pedestrian light, narrowly missing a turning bus. A large red tick of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: When a traffic light flashes a red pedestrian light, you should finish crossing but you should not begin to cross. In most circumstances if you are walking within 20 metres of a pedestrian crossing you must use the crossing. Using mobile phones or other devices while you’re crossing the road can be distracting.

[Animation shows workers inside an office. One holds a mobile phone with a travel app.]

Narrator: If you know you are going to catch a bus, plan ahead by checking a bus timetable or real-time app before you leave.

[Animation shows commuters near a bus stop at a busy city intersection. A pedestrian crosses safely on a green pedestrian light. A large green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: When crossing the road at traffic lights, make sure that vehicles have stopped before you start to cross on the green pedestrian light. Remember to wait until all vehicles have stopped before you start to cross.

[Animation shows a bus indicate and pull over at a bus stop. We see the brake lights on the back of the bus. A passenger exits, walks along the footpath to the rear of the bus and attempts to cross the road behind the bus, but does not see an oncoming car approach. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: When you get off a bus, don’t step out from behind the bus, as oncoming traffic may not be able to see you.
[Animation shows pedestrian crossing the road behind the bus, even though there is an oncoming car. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: Never assume that an approaching driver can see you or stop for you in time to avoid a collision, as their vision may be affected by the sun, poor light and parked cars.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the passenger exits the bus, walks along the footpath to a pedestrian crossing, waits for the bus and the oncoming car to pass before using the crossing. A large green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: And when you get off a bus, don’t cross in front of the bus as the driver may not see you or be able to stop in time to avoid a collision. Wait until the bus has driven off and there is clear sight of the road from both directions of traffic before you start to cross the road.

[Animation shows a bus pulling into a large bus interchange, where many commuters are waiting at stops to board buses.]

Narrator: Bus interchanges can be busy and complex road environments where a range of transport options converge such as buses, trains and taxis. There is also a high level of pedestrian activity and interaction between vehicles and pedestrians.

[Passengers exit the bus and walk towards a nearby set of traffic lights with pedestrian signals. As the traffic starts to flash a red pedestrian light, some pedestrians start to cross. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: When you get off a bus at a bus interchange, don’t start to cross the road if the traffic light flashes a red pedestrian light.

[The traffic light turns green and the bus moves off, but some pedestrians have walked in front of the bus. One of the pedestrians is using a mobile phone and does not look up to see the bus approaching. The red cross graphic is shown.]

Narrator: Avoid running in front of buses waiting to depart. When walking in traffic do not let yourself be distracted by using mobile phones or other devices. If you are waiting for a bus at a bus stop or interchange, stand at a safe distance from the kerb.

[A bus stops at the busy interchange and commuters exit and enter the bus. Pedestrians cross on the green pedestrian light at the traffic lights nearby.]
Narrator: When crossing the road at traffic lights, make sure that vehicles have stopped before you start to cross on the green pedestrian light.

[The bus drives off after the lights turn green. Pedestrians wait until the green pedestrian light shows to cross the road. The green tick of approval is shown.]

Narrator: In most circumstances, if you are walking within 20 metres of a pedestrian crossing, you must use the crossing.

Title: Cycling around buses

[Animation shows a bus on a busy four-lane urban street. Double unbroken white lines mark the centre of the road. The bus travels in Bus Lane on the left. A bicycle rider travels behind the bus and a car travels beside the bus.]

Narrator: Bicycle riders should be aware that buses have blind spots due to their size and shape.

[The cyclist speeds up and travels beside the bus. As the bus approaches a traffic light, it indicates to turn left, but unfortunately, the bicycle rider cannot see the indicator. The red cross is shown.]

Narrator: In certain road situations, bus drivers may not always be able to see them. For this reason, bicycle riders should avoid riding beside a bus in traffic.

[Animation shows a large red triangular area across the intersection, marking the space a bus needs to turn.]

Narrator: When turning, buses can take up more than one lane. By law, bicycle riders must give way to a bus that is turning left.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the bicycle rider stays behind the bus, sees the left-hand indicator flashing, and waits for the bus to turn left before riding on. The green tick is shown.]

Narrator: So if a bus is turning left, stay behind the bus and wait for it to turn before safely continuing your journey. Remember, bicycle riders may travel in a Bus Lane, Transit Lane or Truck Lane but are not permitted to use a Bus Only Lane. When riding in traffic with buses and other heavy vehicles, stay alert and ride conspicuously.

[Animation shows passengers inside a bus. An elderly woman sits towards the rear of the bus. While the bus is moving, she changes seats twice before standing near the front of the bus.]

Narrator: If you are an older passenger, a person with a disability or are pregnant it is safer to try to sit closer to the front of the bus or in a courtesy seat.

This way you can avoid having to make your way to the front of the bus while the bus is moving.

[When a passenger sitting near the elderly woman pushes the stop button, she nearly loses her balance when the bus stops quickly. The red cross is shown.]

Narrator: Avoid pressing the button to stop the bus at the last minute. This can make it hard for the driver to stop safely in time.

[The animation is repeated, but this time the elderly woman is sitting near the front of the bus. She pushes the stop button, waits for the bus to stop before standing up, and holds the handrails as she exits the bus. The green tick is shown.]

Narrator: Wait until the bus has stopped before you get out of your seat and make sure you hold on as you walk down the bus.

[Animation shows many commuters at a busy city bus stop, a large bus interchange, and passengers inside a bus.]

Narrator: Buses carry many people with different needs. To make your bus trip safe for you, the driver and fellow passengers it helps to be alert and considerate of other passengers. By looking out for each other on and around buses we can all help make the roads safer for everyone.

End credits: Be Bus Aware, Be safe on and around buses, Bus Safety Week logo, bebusaware.com.au, NSW Government Transport for NSW logo.

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Bus Safety, Be Bus Aware - 1 minute, 23 seconds

[Close-up of a man in a tree-lined street. A traffic light turns from red to green as the man jogs along the footpath.]

Soft background music plays.

Voice-over: How many people can say that they're responsible for hundreds of people's welfare every day?

[A woman chooses a file from a rack in an office and walks off.]

Voice-over: Oh, it's a big responsibility, but I don't take risks. Passengers are our cargo and we have to look after them.

[A man in a flouro vest walks toward a bus at a depot. A woman does the same.]

Caption: John Pukler

[Close-up of a man in a bus.]

Voiceover: I’m John, and I’m a bus driver.

Caption: Lorraine Griffiths

[Close-up of a woman in a bus.]

Voiceover: I’m Lorraine, and I’m a bus driver.

[Close-up of a bus stop sign.]

John: Bus drivers have close calls every day.

[Close-up shows a Bronte 440 bus.]

[Commuters are shown boarding buses.]

John: A large challenge of my job is having to anticipate many variables that could happen at any time.]

[Lorraine drives off in a bus.]

Lorraine: Cars cutting in front of heavy vehicles such as buses, is very dangerous.

Graphic: Buses can’t stop quickly

[View through the windscreen as the bus travels down a suburban street.]

[Lorraine inside the bus.]

Lorraine: Makes it very hard for us to pull up safely.]

[John inside a bus.]

John: My customers need to hold the handrails at all times.

[Commuters at a bus stop board a bus.]

John: Because if I have to make a sudden braking movement, they could fall and do themselves serious harm.

[Shot of handrails inside bus.]

Graphic: Hold onto handrails

[A bus approaches a city bus stop.]

John: When you exit my bus, please wait till I depart.

[The bus drives off. Close-up of pedestrian crossing button at  traffic lights.]

Graphic: Follow the rules and cross with care

John: And find a safe place to cross the road.

Lorraine inside a bus: We’re a longer vehicle and need motorists to understand that it can take two lanes to make a turn, or go around a roundabout.]

[Close-up of front of bus showing left-hand indicator, then rear of bus showing Give Way sign.]

John inside a bus: The biggest challenge with cyclists is that they’re very difficult to see.

[Shot of Lorraine’s reflection in rear vision mirror as she drives a bus.]

John: Unfortunately with a heavy vehicle, we have blind spots.

[Shot of bus side mirror showing view to the rear; shot of bicycle leaning against a wall.]

Graphic: Bike riders, take care around buses

[Lorraine is served a coffee in a cafe.]

Lorraine: Because I do a local route, I know a lot of the passengers.

[Shot of Lorraine inside a bus, shot of a swimmer’s feet before diving into a pool.]

Lorraine: And they’re just like my family.

[Swimmers shown in a pool lanes as John watches drinking a coffee.]

John: Your loved ones are our responsibility.

John inside a bus: So please be bus aware, so we can get them home safely.

End credits: Be Bus Aware, Be safe on and around buses, Bus Safety Week logo, bebusaware.com.au, Towards Zero logo, NSW Government Transport for NSW logo.

 

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