Centre for Road Safety

How sorry will you be?

Our interactive video puts you in the passenger seat of a speeding car, where you choose what happens next.
Read a transcript.

Slowing down saves lives

Speed is the biggest killer on NSW roads, causing about 40 per cent of road deaths each year. Speeding is seen to be more socially acceptable than drink driving, even though it claims many more lives on NSW roads.

“How sorry will you be?” continues our Don’t Rush campaign, featuring Dr Brian Owler, president of the Australian Medical Association. The new Don’t Rush message encourages passengers to tell speeding drivers to slow down. You can’t predict what’s ahead and speeding increases the risk of crashing. If you don’t ask the driver to slow down, you could be sorry later. If you’re in a car with a speeding driver, speak up and tell them to slow down – you may never get a second chance to.

Objectives

  • Reinforce the consequences of speed-related crashes and their impact on the wider community
  • Reinforce the importance of speed compliance among all drivers, especially males
  • Encourage community vigilance among peer groups to speak out against others who break the road rules

Audience

The campaign targets males aged 17 to 49, who are most frequently involved in fatal speed-related crashes.

Delivery

The “How sorry will you be?” message is delivered to NSW drivers through:

  • Online TV
  • Digital banner ads
  • Outdoor advertising
  • Radio advertising


Transcript: How sorry will you be?

[A man waits at night on the side of a road and checks his mobile. The text message on his mobile reads, "Where are you guys?" A car pulls up beside the waiting man.]

DRIVER: Mate, come on, let's go. Sorry I'm late.

MAN: What happened?

[The waiting man gets into the car.]

DRIVER: Just got held up at work, man, as per usual. It's alright, though, we've still got ten minutes till kick-off. So how are you anyway, man? You pumped for the game?

MAN: Yeah.

DRIVER: This is it. This is the big one.

[The car travels fast down a well-lit road with lots of cars parked near the kerb. The driver checks his watch. The dashboard shows the engine revs are very high, near the top of the red line zone. The engine can be hard revving loudly above the sound of music playing in the car.]

[Two option boxes appear on the screen for the viewer to choose from: (A) 'DON’T SAY ANYTHING' or (B) 'TELL HIM TO SLOW DOWN’]

[Option A: Pedestrians step onto the road from behind a parked car.]

DRIVER: No, no, no, no, no!

[The car swerves to miss them and crashes into an oncoming car. There is a load crashing sound.]

[Neurosurgeon Dr Brian Owler appears in a dark operating room.]

BRIAN OWLER: Bad choice. You can't predict what's ahead. And speeding increases the risk of crashing. So speak up and tell the driver to slow down. If you don't, you may never get a second chance to.

[End credits: Speeding. How sorry will you be? Don't Rush. Shows logos for Australian Medical Association and NSW Government.]

[An option box appears: ‘SEE THE OTHER OUTCOME’]

[Option B: The car travels fast down a well-lit road with lots of cars parked near the kerb. The engine noise can be heard above the sound of music playing in the car.]

MAN: Hey, take it easy.

[The driver checks the speedometer.]

DRIVER: Ooh. Sorry, mate, that was a bit fast.

[Pedestrians step onto the road from behind a parked car.]

DRIVER: Oh, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa, whoa!

[The drivers stops the car and the pedestrians raise their arms in apology]

DRIVER: Sorry.

[The car travels on.]

[Neurosurgeon Dr Brian Owler appears in a dark operating room.]

BRIAN OWLER: Good choice. You can't predict what's ahead. And speeding increases the risk of crashing. If you're in a speeding car, speak up and tell the driver to slow down. If you don't, you may never get a second chance to.

[End credits: Speeding. How sorry will you be? Don't Rush. Shows logos for Australian Medical Association and NSW Government]

[An option box appears: ‘SEE THE OTHER OUTCOME’ ]

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Speeding. how sorry will you be? don't rush.