Centre for Road Safety

Roundabouts

Narrator: Roundabouts.

[Animation shows a car in a country area approaching a single-lane roundabout.]

Text and narrator: Approaching a roundabout.

Narrator: When you approach a roundabout, you must use your indicator if you intend to turn left or right, or make a U-turn at the roundabout. You must give other road users sufficient notice of your intent to turn.

[As the car nears the roundabout, the left indicator flashes.]

Text and narrator: Entering a roundabout.

[Animation shows a white car entering a single-lane roundabout at the intersection of two roads. A blue car flashes its left indicator as it approaches the roundabout and gives way to the white car, which is already in the roundabout, to the right of the blue car.]

Narrator: When entering a roundabout, you must slow or stop to give way to any vehicle already in the roundabout. You must also continue to use your indicators if you intend to turn left or right, or make a U-turn.

[The blue car waits for the white car to safely pass, before entering the roundabout and turning left.]

Text and narrator: Turning left.

[Animation shows a large twin-lane roundabout at the intersection of two roads. The four roads into the roundabout have double lanes on approach and exit. There are two sets of lane markings on each approach to the roundabout. The outside lane nearest the kerb has arrows showing you may travel to the left or straight ahead. The other lane has arrows showing you may travel straight ahead or turn right through the roundabout.]

[A blue car in the left lane flashes its left indicator as it approaches the roundabout.]

Narrator: When turning left, you must indicate left on approach and be travelling in the left-hand lane, unless there are road markings with other instructions. Stay in the left lane and exit in the left lane.

[The blue car enters the roundabout and turns left.]

Text and narrator: Turning right.

[The blue car approaches the same large twin-lane roundabout, but travels in the right-hand lane and flashes its right indicator.]

Narrator: When turning right, you must indicate right on approach and be travelling in the right-hand lane, unless there are road markings with other instructions.

[The blue car travels through the roundabout in the right-hand lane and exits safely.]

Text and narrator: Making a U-turn.

[The blue car approaches the same twin-lane roundabout. It travels in the right-hand lane and its right indicator flashes.]

Narrator: When using a roundabout to make a U-turn, you must approach in the right lane and signal right.

[The blue car completes a full circle of the roundabout and exits in the opposite direction.]

Text and narrator: Changing lanes in a roundabout.

[The blue car approaches the same twin-lane roundabout, travels in the right-hand lane and its right indicator flashes.]

Narrator: Drivers may change lanes in a roundabout if they wish.

[The blue car enters the roundabout and turns right. It then indicates left and changes into the left lane on exiting the roundabout.]

Narrator: The usual road rules for changing lanes apply. You must use your indicator and give way to any vehicle in the lane you are entering.

Text and narrator: Going straight ahead.

Narrator: You don't need to signal when approaching the roundabout if you are going straight ahead.

[The blue car travelling straight ahead enters a single-lane roundabout. The car indicates left to exit the roundabout.]

Narrator: You may approach the roundabout from either the left or right lane, unless there are road markings with other instructions.

[The blue car approaches the twin-lane roundabout. It travels in the right lane through the roundabout and indicates left as it exits.]

Text and narrator: Exiting a roundabout

[The blue car approaches the twin-lane roundabout, travels in the right-hand lane and its right indicator flashes.]

Narrator: As when you exit a road, you must signal left when leaving a roundabout, if it is practical to do so, and you should stop indicating as soon as you have exited the roundabout.

[The blue car turns 90 degrees through the roundabout and indicates left as it exits.]

Narrator: However, when you are travelling straight ahead on a small single-lane roundabout, it may be impractical to indicate when exiting.

[The blue car travels straight ahead through a small single-lane roundabout. It is not practical for the car to indicate to exit.]

Back to Roundabouts.

Pedestrians

Text and narrator: Giving way to pedestrians when turning.

[A man waits to cross a road that forms a T intersection with another road on his right. As he starts to cross, a car approaches the man from behind. The car has its indicator on to turn left into the road where the man is crossing.]

Narrator: If you are turning left or right at an intersection, you must give way to any pedestrian crossing the road that you are about to enter.

[The car stops and waits for the man to cross before it turns left and enters the road.]

Narrator: This rule applies to intersections both with and without traffic lights, however, it doesn't apply at roundabouts.

Back to Pedestrians.

Mobile phones

Text and narrator: Mobile phones

[We see the view as we travel in the back seat of a car, looking over the driver’s shoulder through the windscreen to the road ahead. The driver has both hands on the steering wheel. A mobile phone is mounted on the dashboard in a spot that does not obscure the driver’s view.]

Narrator: You can only use a mobile phone while driving if it is secured in a commercially manufactured and designed mounting that is fixed to the vehicle and doesn't obscure your view of the road.

[A ring alert flashes on screen of the mobile phone. The driver wears an earpiece and answers the phone via bluetooth, while keeping both hands on the steering wheel.]

Narrator: Or, if you can operate it without touching any part of the phone, for example, by using bluetooth or voice activation.

Graphic: A large green tick of approval is shown.

[We now see the driver with a mobile phone tucked between his shoulder and ear. The driver has only one hand on the steering wheel.]

Narrator: While driving, a mobile phone must not rest on your leg, be between your shoulder and ear, or any other part of your body.

Graphic: A large red cross of disapproval is shown.

[We now see the driver using the mobile phone in his left hand while driving. Only his right hand is on the steering wheel.]

Narrator: It must not be used for text messaging, video messaging, emailing or similar activities.

Graphic: A large red cross of disapproval is shown.

[The driver has stopped the car in a parking zone on the side of the road. He is using the mobile phone with his left hand.]

Narrator: Drivers can only use a hand-held mobile phone if their vehicle is parked in an authorised parking spot, with the engine turned off.

Graphic: A large green tick of approval is shown.

[The driver is stopped at traffic lights on a red signal. He is using a mobile phone with his left hand and has only his right hand holds the steering wheel.]

Narrator: They cannot use a hand-held mobile phone while stopped at traffic lights.

Graphic: A large red cross of disapproval is shown.

[We now see the driver with both hands on the wheel. His phone is mounted on the dashboard and displays a navigation function on the screen.]

Narrator: Drivers may use the navigational or GPS function of a phone while driving, as long as the phone is secured in a fixed mounting.

Graphic: A large green tick of approval is shown.

Graphic: Learner, provisional P1 and provsional P2 drivers must not use any function of a mobile phone while driving or when the ignition is on.

Narrator: Learner, provisional P1 and provisional P2 drivers must not use any function of a mobile phone while driving or when the ignition is on.

Back to Mobile phones.

Merging

Text and narrator: Merging.

Text and narrator: Merging when the number of lanes is reduced.

[An aerial shot shows a green car on a straight stretch of country road with three lanes. The car travels in the left lane of a double-lane section marked with broken white lines. Double white lines separate a single lane for oncoming traffic.]

[The car approaches a sign that reads: Form 1 lane 200m.]

Narrator: When you are travelling on a road without lane markings and the number of lanes or lines of traffic is reduced you must merge by giving way to any vehicle that is ahead of you.

[As the green car indicates to merge right, a blue car in the right lane approaches from behind. The blue car’s red brake lights can be seen as the car slows down to allow the green car room to merge as the road becomes a single lane.]

Narrator: This is often called a zipper merge.

Text and narrator: Changing lanes when a marked lane ends.

[An aerial shot shows a straight stretch of country road with three lanes. A blue car travels in the left lane of a double-lane section marked with broken white lines. A white car travels in the same direction in the right lane. Double white lines separate a single lane for oncoming traffic.]

[As the white car approaches the blue car, they pass a sign that reads: Left lane ends 500m.]

Narrator: When you are travelling in a marked lane which is ending and you need to cross a broken painted line to enter the adjacent lane, you must give way to traffic travelling in the lane being entered.

[As the blue car indicates to merge right, its red brake lights can be seen as it slows down to allow the white car to pass. As the left lane ends, the blue car crosses the broken painted line.]

Back to Merging.

Keeping left

Text and narration: Keeping left

[An aerial view shows a blue car behind a white car on a four-lane road in the country. Both cars are in the left lane. The road is marked down the centre by double white lines.]

Narrator: On multi-lane roads with a speed limit of more than 80 km/h, you must not drive in the right-hand lane, unless: you are overtaking . . .

[The blue car overtakes the white car and returns to the left lane.]

Narrator: turning . . .

[The blue car travels in the left lane on a double-lane section of divided road. As an exit on the right approaches, the blue car indicates and crosses into the right lane, then into the right exit lane to turn.]

Narrator: Avoiding an obstacle . . .

[A blue car travels in the left lane of on a four-lane road in the country. The road is marked down the centre with double white lines. The blue car indicates and moves to the right-hand lane to avoid tyre wreckage on the side of the road.]

Narrator: Driving in congested traffic . . .

[The blue car travels in the right lane of a four-lane road in the country. The road is marked down the centre by double white lines. There is heavy traffic and red brake lights can be seen on many of the vehicles.]

Narrator: Driving in a special purpose lane, or if there is a must turn left lane, or a left traffic arrow, and you are not turning left.

[A blue car travels on a four-lane road in the country. The road is marked down the centre with double white lines. The left lane is marked with white arrows pointing to an exit on the left. The car passes a sign that reads: Rest Area 200m on left. The blue car indicates and moves to the right lane to avoid the exit on the left.]

Narrator: If a keep left unless overtaking sign is displayed, the requirement applies regardless of the speed limit.

[A blue car travels behind a white car on a four-lane road in the country. The road is marked down the centre with double white lines.

The cars pass a sign that reads: KEEP LEFT UNLESS OVERTAKING. Both cars travel correctly in the left lane.]

Back to Keeping left.

Headlights

Text and narrator: Using headlights and fog lights

Narrator: You must not use your headlights on high beam if travelling less than 200 metres behind a vehicle travelling in the same direction, or when less than 200 metres from an oncoming vehicle.

[Animation shows a green car travelling behind a blue car on a straight stretch of road at night. When the green car closes the gap to the blue car in front to 200m, it dims its headlights.]

[On the same stretch of road, the green car and blue car approach each other from opposite directions. When they are 200 metres apart, both cars dim their headlights.]
Narrator: It is an offence to flash your headlights unless the vehicle is being used to respond to an emergency.

Text: Dazzling

[The driver of the blue car shields his eyes with his hand from the powerful lights of an oncoming vehicle.]

Narrator: A driver must not use any light fitted to their vehicle that may dazzle another road user.

Text: Fog lights

[The blue car travels through fog on a country road. The cars headlights are turned on.]

Narrator: You can only use your fog lights if driving in fog, mist, or other atmospheric conditions that restrict your visibility.

[The blue car’s fog lights are turned on.]

Back to Headlights.

U-turns

Text and narrator: U-turns

Text and narrator: Making a U-turn

[An aerial view shows a blue car on a two-lane straight length of country road, divided down the centre by a broken white line.]

Narrator: When making a U-turn, you must have a clear view of any approaching traffic and be able to make the turn without unreasonably obstructing the free movement of traffic.

[The blue car brakes and indicates right. A white car travelling in the opposite direction passes the blue. The blue car waits until the road is clear before making a U-turn.

Narrator: You must also give way to all vehicles and pedestrians.

Narrator: You are not allowed to make a U-turn when:

Narrator: A no U-turn sign is displayed,

[The blue car travels on two-lane road separated down the middle by nature strips. There is a large No U-turn sign on one section of nature strip. The blue car brakes, indicates and turns right, incorrectly making a U-turn. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: Across a single continuous dividing line,

[An aerial view shows a blue car on a two-lane straight length of country road, divided down the centre by a continuous white line. The blue car brakes, indicates and illegally makes a U-turn across the continuous white line. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: Across a single continuous dividing line to the left of a broken line,

[The blue car travels on a two-lane straight length of country road. The road is divided down the centre by a continuous white dividing line to the left of a broken line. The blue car brakes, indicates and illegally makes a U-turn across the continuous white line. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Narrator: Across two parallel continuous dividing lines.

[The blue car travels on a two-lane straight length of country road. The road is divided down the centre two continuous parallel white dividing lines. The blue car brakes, indicates and illegally makes a U-turn across the continuous white lines. A large red cross of disapproval is shown.]

Text: U-turns at traffic lights

Narrator: U-turns at traffic lights.

Text: You must not make a U-turn at traffic lights unless there is a ‘U-turn permitted’ sign displayed or a green U-turn traffic light is displayed.

Back to U-turns.

Safe following distances

Text and narrator: Safe following distances.

Narrator: Safe following distances may vary depending on the conditions, the type of vehicle being driven, and the speed at which the vehicle is travelling.

[An aerial view shows a straight length of two-lane country road, divided down the centre by a broken white line. There is an 80 km/h speed limit sign to the left of the screen, and a tree to the right of the screen.]

[A blue car travels across the stretch of road. It is followed by a white car, which is followed by a red car.]

Narrator: As a general rule, when following a vehicle, you should travel three seconds behind the vehicle in front to provide enough time to avoid a crash.

[The red car passes to the right of the screen, followed by a blue car. The cars are shown frozen in this position.]

Graphic: A white arrow drawn between the two cars shows a stopwatch with the words “3 seconds” inside a speech bubble.

Narrator: An easy way to estimate this is to count how long it takes you to pass the same object as the vehicle in front of you.

[A white car is followed by a red car. As the white car nears the tree, a white arrow flashes above the tree.]

[A stopwatch is shown in the centre of the screen. As the red car approaches the tree, three seconds count on the stopwatch.]

Narrator: This should be at least three seconds.

Back to Safe following distances.

School zones

Text and narration: School zones

[We see the view through the front windscreen to the road ahead and the driver’s hands on the steering wheel. The driver approaches a 40km/h sign with a flashing yellow light. The sign reads: SCHOOL ZONE 8-9.30am 2-4pm SCHOOL DAYS.]

[The driver slows down and the speedometer drops from 60 km/h to 40 km/h.]

Narrator: Drivers must obey the school zone speed limit of 40 km/h between the school zone and end school zone signs.

[The driver passes a school and travels over a pedestrian crossing.]

Narrator: The school zone speed limit applies on New South Wales government school days and during the times on the school zone sign.

[The driver passes a sign that reads: END SCHOOL ZONE 60. The driver accelerates from 40 to 60 km/h.]

Text: School zone hours.

Graphic of sign: SCHOOL ZONE 8-9.30am 2.30-4pm SCHOOL DAYS 40.

Narrator: School zone hours are normally 8am until 9.30am and then 2.30pm until 4pm.

Graphic of sign: SCHOOL ZONE 7.30-9am 2-4pm SCHOOL DAYS 40.

Narrator: Some schools have non-standard school zone times. These non-standard school zones have signs that show the different hours of operation in red.

Text and narrator: School zones are enforceable on all NSW government school days. These include pupil free days and days when non-government schools may or may not be in operation.

[An aerial view shows cars passing a school zone flashing lights sign. The cars brake as they enter the school zone and travel past the school.]

Narrator: School zones operate and are enforced on pupil free days because pupil free days can vary from school to school. Consistent operation of school zones aims to reduce driver confusion, which improves the safety of school children.

Back to School zones.

Yellow traffic lights

Text: Yellow traffic lights

Narrator: Yellow traffic lights. A yellow traffic light or arrow means stop.

Graphic: Two sets of traffic lights are shown. The first has three lights from top to bottom, with the centre yellow signal lit. The second has a set of three traffic lights, as well as three right-turn arrows. The green traffic light and the yellow right-turn arrow are lit.]

[A red stop sign appears over the two sets of lights.}

Narrator: When you approach a yellow traffic light you must stop, if you can stop safely before reaching the stop line or traffic lights.

[An aerial view shows a car approaching a set of traffic lights. As the lights change from green to yellow, the car brakes and stops safely before reaching the stop line or traffic lights.

Text and narration: Penalties apply to drivers who fail to stop at a yellow traffic light when they would have been able to safely stop before reaching the stop line.

Back to Yellow traffic lights.