Centre for Road Safety

Changing driver behaviour

As part of the NSW Government’s commitment to reducing road trauma and serious injuries, the effectiveness of speed camera programs in NSW is reviewed each year. The 2016 speed camera review shows that speed cameras continue to deliver positive road safety benefits.

Mobile speed cameras

Overall, the mobile speed camera program continues to deliver positive road safety benefits, compared with results before the reintroduction of the mobile speed camera program in 2010.

NSW speed survey data for the last seven years shows a reduced number of light vehicles exceeding the speed limit, across all speed zones. However, comparing the 2015 speed survey results against those from 2014, there was an increased number of light vehicles exceeding the speed limit in about half of NSW speed zones measured. Specifically:

  • More light vehicles were measured exceeding the speed limit by up to 10km/h in 40km/h school zones, 90km/h, 100km/h and 110km/h zones
  • More light vehicles were measured exceeding the speed limit by 10km/h+ in 40km/h school zones, 50kmh, 90km/h, 100km/h and 110km/h zones.

This speed survey data is aligned with increased fatalities in 2015:

Fatality data200920142015
Fatalities on NSW roads453307350
Fatality rate per head of population6.424.14.6
Speed related fatalities on NSW roads207127146

Comparing the 2015 results to the 2014 results, there was also an increased number of heavy vehicles exceeding the speed limit. This was the case in about one third of NSW speed zones measured:

  • More heavy vehicles were measured exceeding the speed limit by up to 10km/h in 40km/h school zones and 90km/h zones
  • More heavy vehicles were measured exceeding the speed limit by 10km/h+ in 40km/h school zones, 60kmh, 90km/h and 100km/h zones.

More than 99 per cent of all vehicles that pass mobile speed cameras are not infringed for speeding. This high rate of compliance has remained consistent since 2010.

Fixed speed cameras

Overall, when comparing the five years before the fixed speed cameras were installed with the most recent five years, there has been a reduction in the number of fatal crashes and injury crashes at camera locations.

Results at fixed speed camera locations show there has been a:

  • 31 per cent reduction in casualty crashes
  • 92 per cent reduction in fatalities
  • 36 per cent reduction in injuries.

The reduction in fatalities and injuries represents a saving of $570 million to the community.

Of the 110 fixed speed camera locations, seven locations operate in warning mode and five locations are high-risk sites located in tunnels. Recommendations are not provided for these 12 locations.

For the remaining 98 fixed speed camera locations:

  • 78 locations were found to offer continued safety benefits
  • 5 locations were identified for review
  • 3 locations were identified for ongoing monitoring in future years
  • 3 locations had insufficient data to review
  • 9 locations were ineligible for review.

Five locations were identified for review because of major roadworks. The ongoing need for fixed speed cameras will be assessed at:

  • Berry - Princes Highway, between Kangaroo Valley Road and Victoria Street
  • Foxground - Princes Highway, between Foxground Road and Broughton Creek
  • Hungry Head - Pacific Highway, between Boundary Road and Ballards Road
  • Terrigal - Terrigal Drive, between Brunswick Road and Bellbird Avenue
  • Valla Beach - Pacific Highway, between Valla Beach Road and Oyster Creek

Three locations were identified for ongoing monitoring in future years:

  • Bonnyrigg - Elizabeth Drive, between Brown Road and Humphries Road
  • Gwynneville - M1 Princes Motorway, University Avenue Overpass and Mount Ousley Road (southbound)
  • South Windsor - George Street, between Rickaby Street and Yarrawonga Street

While there was an increased number of casualty crashes at these three locations listed above, this was not a statistically significant result.

The 10 highest infringing fixed speed cameras all have high compliance rates, with more than 99 per cent of drivers passing the cameras without being infringed for speeding.

None of the 10 highest infringing fixed speed camera locations were identified for review or ongoing monitoring. However, there is currently a review underway at Rydalmere, the fifth highest infringing location, which has an overall compliance rate of 99.38 per cent.

Red-light speed cameras

Overall, there has been a reduction in fatal crashes and injury crashes at red-light speed camera locations since the cameras were installed, compared with the five year period before installation.

Results at red-light speed camera locations show there has been a:

  • 30 per cent reduction in the number of fatal and serious injury crashes
  • 42 per cent reduction in fatalities
  • 31 per cent reduction in serious injuries
  • 39 per cent reduction in pedestrian casualties.

The reduction in fatalities and serious injuries represents a saving of $105 million to the community.

Of the 155 red-light speed camera locations, 98 locations have not yet been installed for 5 years. Recommendations are not provided for these 98 locations.

For the remaining 57 locations:

  • 46 were found to offer continued safety benefits
  • 11 locations were identified for ongoing monitoring in future years

For the eleven locations identified for ongoing monitoring, there has been an increased number of casualty crashes, but this was not a statistically significant result. The eleven locations are:

  • Blacktown - Bungarribee Road at Balmoral Street
  • Blacktown - Newton Road at Flushcombe Road
  • Campsie - Canterbury Road at Bexley Road
  • Granville - Woodville Road at M4 westbound on-ramp
  • Milperra - Newbridge Road at Henry Lawson Drive
  • Mosman - Military Road at Cowles Road
  • North Ryde - Wicks Road at Epping Road
  • Petersham - Gordon Street at New Canterbury Road
  • Petersham - Parramatta Road at West Street
  • Smithfield - Victoria Street at Hassall Street
  • South Penrith - Parker Street at Jamison Road

None of the red-light speed camera locations were identified for review.

The 10 highest infringing red-light speed cameras all have high compliance rates, with more than 99 per cent of drivers passing the cameras without being infringed for speeding.

None of the 10 highest infringing fixed speed camera locations were identified for review or ongoing monitoring.

Average speed cameras

Analysis of average speed enforcement lenghts (formerly known as point-to-point speed lengths) shows that there has been a low number of heavy vehicle crashes since cameras started operating. Infringement data for average speed offences in the 25 point-to-point enforcement lengths shows a high level of compliance and a low number of infringements.

Annual reviews

Since our first speed camera review in 2012, we have reviewed the effectiveness of NSW speed cameras each year. Detailed information is available in the NSW speed camera program reviews.